The connected customer: delivering an effortless experience | ITWeb

I got involved in the initiative to establish a professional association for the CX industry because of a personal discomfort with some to the approaches to the discipline that I see from some big brands. Here’s an example…. Companies that equate CX to technology are not being accurate.

The vast majority (81%) of organisations also believe customer operations will be positively impacted by AI and CX robotics in the future, followed by business insight and customer intelligence (66%) and workplace management/operational productivity (53%). However, the implementation of AI remains difficult. Looking forward, businesses must find a solution for the current lack of skills across the business, which is currently considered a challenge for more than half (58%) of organisations today.

Source: The connected customer: delivering an effortless experience | ITWeb

Before You Amaze Your Customers You Must Amaze Your Employees | CX Journey™

The Cult of Uncertainty: This is where the employee journey begins—day one of their experience with a company. It begins before they are even hired, with the application and interview up until the first day on the job. New employees don’t know what to expect, and so they have a feeling of uncertainty. They can only hope for a great experience. It is the company’s job to inform the employee of what to expect from day one, and remove any lingering uncertainty as soon as possible.

Source: Before You Amaze Your Customers You Must Amaze Your Employees | CX Journey™

Customer Journey Mapping – are ‘static’ maps a waste of time and money? – I J Golding

If you have ever heard me speak, or read something I have ‘penned’, you will know that I am a huge believer in the application of the ‘science’ of customer experience – an understanding of; and the ability to apply; the competencies that sit behind

Source: Customer Journey Mapping – are ‘static’ maps a waste of time and money? – I J Golding

After the 94.7 cycle race

This past weekend, I cycled the 94.7 Ride Joburg. Having done some deep reflections lately, I’ve decided to pen a few thoughts.

Have pondered whether I should share the raw, unadulterated truth, or keep a brave face. In truth, it has been a difficult time, perhaps the most difficult ever. There is hurt, mistakes, failures, betrayals. Perhaps, a few words of truth will give me personal closure and resonate with you, should the experience relate.

I’m emerging from a big failure. Some days are better than others, and it takes a lot to keep being and thinking positively. Again, some days are better than others.

So here’s the day of the 94.7 race. I’ve never done it. It’s intimidating. Here are a few important lessons that I learned on the day:

We are not an island and we are not alone.

I had not understood or valued the impact of unknown supporters at the side of the road. I learned to value a shout, a clap from so many strangers, who came out for me.

The race was not very hard, but some parts were extremely tough. I was supported by a fitter, not prepared partner / brother and he put his plans and ego aside to accompany me. I did it, completed it because of teamwork.

When I cycled down the end straight, I started crying. I was overwhelmed that I did it, that I completed the race, that I have earned a finish and a medal.

In such moments, when personal confidence is low, and we face serious, critical life moments, small actions and victories are needed to help us move forward.

Just thought I would share.